Diabetes Support

Providing Tools & Information for Diabetic Health

Category: Diabetic Articles (Page 3 of 7)

How Much you Should Exercise and When

Today, the one thing that everyone agrees on is that exercise improves health and can help reverse many medical conditions. Even people who cannot exercise for long periods due to being out of shape or busy lifestyles can now benefit from recent research regarding exercise.
Exercise Programs and Routines

Recent studies show that several, short periods of exercise after eating is more effective than continuous exercise for lowering fat and triglyceride levels in the bloodstream. This new research supports multiple 10-minute periods of exercise that add up to at least 30 minutes a day on most days of the week, as a way to reduce the risk of heart disease.

Additionally, if you also want to lose excess weight and/or lower blood sugar levels, the best time to do your exercise time is before breakfast, before lunch and before dinner.
Walking for Exercise

A good type of exercise to start with if you have not been exercising or are out of shape is to begin by just walking. Then as you get accustomed to the walking you can increase your pace, or if you wish, begin a more vigorous exercise regimen.

Take those walks and in one week you will start to feel the difference! In two weeks you’ll be amazed!


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The Dangers of Microwaving Your Food

The Microwave oven is a standard feature in just about every household today. It is as common as the TV, and there are dozens of microwave cookbooks available in any bookshop.

Unfortunately, the more this kitchen tool is looked into, the more it becomes clear they are unsafe and a threat to your health and the health of your family, as can be seen from the following:

“Heating food in a microwave oven is very convenient but recent studies have shown that it may not only impact the nutrition of the food, it also may be dangerous to those who eat the food.”

“According to an announcement about infant bottles from the University of Minnesota in 1989 “Heating the bottle in a microwave can cause slight changes in the milk. In infant formulas, there may be a loss of some vitamins.”

“According to research, cooking food in a microwave may alter the physical make up of the food. It is known that the irradiation process breaks up the molecular structure of food and creates a whole new set of chemicals. These chemicals include benzene [Definition: chemical used in making insecticides and motor fuels], formaldehyde [Definition: fluid used for preserving dead bodies] and a host of known mutagens [Definition: substances that increases the rate of cell mutation] and carcinogens [Definition: cancer causing substances].”

“A study performed by Dr. Hans Hertel of Switzerland found that food prepared in microwave ovens not only altered the food, it also altered the blood chemistry of those eating it.”

“Microwaving food in plastic containers runs the additional risk of the food absorbing dangerous chemicals released when the plastic is bombarded and heated by radiation.”

Dr. J. D. Decuypere


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Neuropathy Drugs Increase Suicide Risk

The FDA just released the analysis of 199 studies done on a total of 44,000 patients who were taking anti-epileptic drugs. The results showed there was twice the risk of suicidal behavior in using anti-epileptic drugs as compared with patients taking a placebo.

Two of the anti-epileptic drugs in these studies were Gabapentin (marketed as Neurontin) and Pregabalin (marketed as Lyrica). Both of these drugs are advertised for neuropathy and are made by the drug company Pfizer.

In 2004 Pfizer was fined by the FDA and paid over $430 million for promoting Neurontin to doctors as a medication for neuropathy, a use for which it was never approved!

So here we have a drug company making two drugs that are prescribed by doctors for neuropathy, one of which was never approved by the FDA for that use, and both are associated with increased risk of suicidal behavior.

(If you know of friends or relatives taking Neurontin or Lyrica, feel free to forward this article to them. You just might save a life!)

Drugs can never heal the body as they are an alien substance in the body. They cannot address the root of the problem, which for most people who have neuropathy, are very specific nutritional deficiencies.


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Are Pre-Packaged “Low Carb” Foods Really Low Carb?

In the last couple of years there have been more and more prepackaged foods going onto shelves in supermarkets and health food shops that are advertised as having a “Low Carb” content.

Being a diabetic, it is important to maintain a low carb intake for several reasons: 1) carbs convert to sugar (glucose) in the digestive tract and raise blood sugar levels, 2) to compensate for the increase in sugar coming into the bloodstream, the body increases its production of insulin, which adds to the already existing problem of insulin resistance that diabetics must deal with, and 3) the excess sugar in the bloodstream that cannot be pushed into the cells of the body for food and energy get converted into triglycerides (fat) and get packed away in the fat cells causing weight gain.

To maintain a low carb diet the diabetic must have the correct information on the carb content of the food he or she is eating. Many new pre-packaged foods today have prominent wording the front of the packaging about it being “Low Carb” and stating that the product has only so many “net carbs” or “effective carbs” per serving.

Some of the “low carb” products that can be found on shelves are energy bars, noodles and even cookies. In inspecting several of these products, the energy bars had 2 “Effective Carbs” per serving, but when looking at the nutritional panel on the back it said Total Carbohydrates per serving was 24. The noodles advertised 5 “Net Carbs” per serving on the front, but the nutritional panel on the back stated Total Carbohydrates per serving was 43. The cookies advertised at only 2 “Net Carbs”, yet the nutritional panel stated Total Carbohydrates at 15.

How can this contradiction be and which information is correct?

Not counting carbs occurs two ways: The first is that some food manufacturers use sugar alcohols as ingredients to sweeten their products. The common sugar alcohols used are mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, isomalt, and maltitol amongst others.

Because these sugar alcohols are not technically sugar (even though they do contain carbs and do raise blood sugar levels — but more slowly than sugar) the food manufacturers do not count their carb content or label it as zero.

The second way that carbs are not counted is: Fiber is known to help lower blood sugar levels. Because of this, certain food manufacturers count the number of grams of fiber per serving and subtract that number from the number of carbohydrates. Of course this is not based on any scientific evidence that the fiber cancels the carbs, but these food manufacturers do it anyway.

By using the above two techniques the result is “Net Carbs” or “Effective Carbs” which are advertised on the front of the packaging as the carb contents per serving.

But if you look at the nutritional panel on the back of these products it lists the true Total Carbohydrates per serving, which is required by law to be shown there.

So, do not be fooled by misleading advertising gimmicks, judge the carb content by looking at the Total Carbohydrates in the nutritional panel on the back of the product. If you have been using these incorrectly labeled products, you now know the real carb content of the foods you are eating. This will make it easier to keep your blood sugar levels under control.


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Why You Don’t Want Reduced Fat Milk in Your Diet

If you were to visit a milk processing plant, you would see it is filled with all types of stainless steel equipment and machinery.

Inside that machinery, the milk shipped from farms around the processing plant is completely re-made, so that there is so much protein, so much butterfat, etc.

This is done so that the milk products produced are both uniform and meet the standards for milk products set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

First the milk is separated with special machinery into fat, protein and various other solids and liquids. Once separated, these are remixed to set levels for whole, low-fat and no-fat milks.

The butterfat left over goes into butter, cream, cheese, toppings and ice cream.

When the fat is removed to make reduced fat milks, they replace the fat with powdered milk concentrate. All reduced-fat milks have dried skim milk added to give them body, although this ingredient is not usually on the labels.

The powdered skim milk concentrate is created by high temperature spray drying. The result is a very high-protein, low-fat product.

The milk is forced through a tiny hole at high pressure, and then blown out into the air. This causes the cholesterol in the milk to oxidize (chemically changed).

NOTE: The natural cholesterol found in food contributes to health and is a vital part of every cell membrane in your body.

However, you do not want to eat oxidized cholesterol. Oxidized cholesterol contributes to atherosclerosis (the buildup of plaque inside the arteries), which causes high blood pressure that eventually leads to heart attacks and strokes.

So when you drink any kind of reduced-fat milk thinking that it will help you avoid heart disease, you are actually consuming oxidized cholesterol, which contributes to the process of heart disease as it builds up on the inside walls of your arteries.

The moral to this story is stay away from any kind of reduced fat milk. If you are going to buy milk buy only whole milk!

If you are lucky enough to live where it is available buy raw unpasturized milk, one of nature’s finest foods.


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Diabetes – Handle Symptoms or Reverse It

Ron Rosedale, M.D., is an internationally recognized expert in nutritional and metabolic medicine [metabolic: of or having to do with the series of processes by which food is converted into the energy and products needed to maintain life] and an anti-aging specialist. In this excerpted article he reviews the incorrect approach “conventional medicine” is taking towards diabetes. He says:

“As I have stated previously, and one concept that I would like to make well-known to save thousands and perhaps millions of lives as soon as possible, is that diabetes is not a disease of blood sugar, but a disease of insulin and perhaps more importantly leptin [a hormone produced by the fat stored in the body].

“Until that concept becomes well-known in the medical community, articles will continue to be published revealing the inadequacy of current conventional medical treatment for chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and the falsity of their advice about nutrition.

“Typically treatment concentrates on fixing a symptom, in this case elevated blood sugar, rather than the underlying disease.

“Treatments which concentrate merely on lowering blood sugar for diabetes while raising insulin levels can actually worsen rather than remedy the actual problem.

“Elevated insulin levels are highly associated and even causative of:

*heart disease,
*peripheral vascular disease [blockage of blood vessels to the arms or legs],
*stroke,
*high blood pressure,
*cancer,
*obesity and many other so-called diseases.

“Since most treatments for type 2, insulin resistant diabetes, utilize drugs which raise insulin or actual insulin injections itself, the tragic result is that the typical, conventional medical treatment for diabetes contributes to the obvious side effects and the shortened lifespan that diabetics experience.”

A proper diet with reduced carbs, effective nutritional supplementation and adding just a bit of regular exercise is a very effective and natural way of reversing the diabetic condition.


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Spice Up the Diabetic Diet

Want to spice up your meal? How about experimenting with different herbs and spices. Varying the flavors of your favorite foods can keep you meals interesting.

Asian: Spices like coriander, cardamom, cumin, lemongrass, ginger, and red pepper will lend your foods an Asian flavor. Several of these spices can be combined to make a delicious seasoning rub for fish and chicken.

Italian: Herbs like parsley, basil, rosemary, and thyme as well as garlic and allspice are key ingredients in Italian food.

Mexican: Use hot peppers, cilantro, and garlic. These seasonings can be used with meat, chicken, and pork, but can also be put in soups and salads.

Crunchy crust: A coating made with flour or bread crumbs is a high-carb no-no. A great, flavorful substitutions for bread crumbs is nuts & seeds (sunflower seeds, walnuts, almonds, brazil nuts, macadamia, etc) They can be chopped (or crushed up in a plastic storage bag) and used to coat fish filets, chicken, shrimp, veggies or anything else you’d normally want to put bread crumbs on

Another idea for breading is to use pork rind flour.

For crab cakes, meat balls and the like, try mixing up a paste of baking powder and beaten egg to use as a binder instead of bread crumbs and egg.

Cajun influence – use Cajun Spices & Seasonings


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Stevia Conversion

Stevia – How to use in different Recipes

Below is the equivalent to “1 cup exchange” In other words, one cup sugar or sucralose (splenda) called for a recipe is equivalent to the below amounts.
If the recipe calls for 1/2 cup exchange, you would use 12 packets blend, etc. etc.

24 packets Stevia Blend
12 tsp. Spoonable Stevia Blend
2.5 tsp. Stevia Extract Liquid
1.5 tsp. PURE Stevia Extract Powder

1/3 tsp “Sweet Leaf” = 1 cup sugar.

NOTE: Not all Stevia Extract Powders are pure. Look for a 28 mg serving size or thereabouts… If the serving size is significantly larger, the Stevia isn’t pure

From a book called “Sugar-Free Cooking with Stevia”

One cup = 48 teaspoons
One cup = 16 tablespoons


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The Symptoms Surrounding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition caused by a diet that is too high in carbohydrates over a long period of time. Ultimately, the high carbohydrate diet brings about a condition known as insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance occurs as a result of the body continuously producing increased insulin in an attempt to maintain normal blood sugar levels.

Carbohydrates are simply long chains of sugar molecules hooked end-to-end. When a person eats carbohydrates their normal digestive process breaks up these chains into the individual sugar molecules, and they pass right through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream, and load up the bloodstream with sugar.

If this happened every once in a while it would not be a problem. But as diets today are so high in carbohydrates, people have a constant high level of sugar pouring into their bloodstream year after year.

This requires their body to continuously produce high levels of insulin to keep that sugar level down. (Insulin’s job is to push sugar out of the bloodstream into the cells where it is used for energy.)

Eventually the cells in their body becomes insensitive to the effects of the insulin (insulin resistance). To handle this problem of insulin resistance their body begins to produce even higher levels of insulin. This continues until their pancreas reaches the maximum amount of insulin it can produce, and when the insulin resistance increases again, their blood sugar begins to rise out of control.

The result is type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is actually an extreme case of insulin resistance.

Not everyone experiences all the symptoms and there is no specific sequence in which these signs of high blood sugar symptoms appear. Some symptoms may appear before the blood sugar levels rise above normal and others may not show up until after the blood sugar levels have gone up.

“High insulin levels, not low insulin levels, are the problem originally associated with Type II diabetes, and high insulin levels are harder to detect because it is normal for insulin levels to rise under many circumstances. The slightly higher insulin level causes slow weight gain, small increases in blood pressure, slow changes in cholesterol numbers and the beginning of artery plaque formation.”

“One by one, diagnoses of obesity, hypertension, cholesterol abnormalities, and heart disease are made without taking into account that these are all related to higher insulin levels and to each other. If the underlying physiology is not corrected, Type II diabetes will likely be the next diagnosis.”

“The physical changes that occur when you have higher insulin levels are so subtle and cause damage over so many years that it takes approximately ten to thirty years for your blood sugar-levels to rise after the initial changes in insulin levels begin. By the time Type II diabetes is diagnosed, chronic high insulin levels have done a lot of metabolic damage though it will seem to happen overnight.”

excerpted from The Schwartzbein Principle II, The Transition
by Diana Schwartzbein, M.D.

In an attempt to reduce the symptoms of insulin resistance or hold them in check, the symptoms are often treated by drugs, medications or insulin. Addressing symptoms does nothing to handle the underlying condition causing it, and so the condition continues to get worse, resulting often in more and more medications to keep the symptoms “under control.”

It can get so crazy that diabetics can wind up being prescribed for several drugs for high blood sugar, as well as another drug for high triglycerides, and another for high cholesterol, and another one for high blood pressure. Yet none of these drugs addresses or corrects the underlying cause of the diabetic condition, insulin resistance!

If you have not yet done so, you can turn your diabetic condition around and improve your overall health by getting onto a high protein/low carbohydrate diet, taking the correct nutritional supplements, and putting a little exercise into your life!


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What is Insulin Resistance and How It Affects Your Body

There are 17 million diabetics in the United States and 80 million more who are in some stage of insulin resistance. A diet high in carbohydrates and lack of nutrition are the two main factors in creating insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a “pre-diabetic” condition, which, when it gets extreme, becomes type 2 diabetes. Below are two doctors clarifying how this condition develops and its effects on the body:

“When cells become resistant to insulin, the receptors on their surfaces designed to respond to insulin have begun to malfunction.”

“It simply means that the receptors require more insulin to make them work properly in removing sugar from the blood. Whereas before they needed just a touch to lower it, now they need a continuous supply of excess insulin to keep blood sugar within normal range.”

“As time goes by, blood sugar rises higher and stays up longer after the carbohydrate meal despite the enormous amount of insulin mustered to lower it. Bear in mind that were your doctor to check blood sugar during this stage of developing insulin resistance, your blood sugar would be perfectly normal. The major silent change taking place is the ever-growing quantity of insulin needed to keep it that way.”

excerpted from Protein Power
by Doctors Michael and Mary Eades

“The liver becomes resistant first, then the muscle tissue, then the fat. What is the effect of insulin on the liver? It is to suppress the production of sugar by the liver.

“The sugar floating around in your body at any one time is the result of two things, the sugar that you have eaten and how much sugar your liver has made. When you wake up in the morning it is more of a reflection of how much sugar your liver has made. If your liver is listening to insulin properly it won’t make much sugar in the middle of the night. If your liver is resistant, those brakes are lifted and your liver starts making a bunch of sugar so you wake up with a bunch of sugar.

“The next tissue to become resistant is the muscle tissue. What is the action of insulin in muscles? It allows your muscles to burn sugar for one thing. So if your muscles become resistant to insulin it can’t burn that sugar that was just manufactured by the liver. So the liver is producing too much, the muscles can’t burn it, and this raises your blood sugar.

“Well the fat cells become resistant, but not for a while. It is only after a while that they become resistant. It takes them longer. Liver first, muscle second, and then your fat cells.

“So for a while your fat cells retain their sensitivity. What is the action of insulin on your fat cells? To store that fat. It takes sugar and it stores it as fat. So until your fat cells become resistant you get fat, and that is what you see. As people become more and more insulin resistant, they get fat and their weight goes up.

“But eventually they plateau. They might plateau at three hundred pounds, two hundred and twenty pounds, one hundred and fifty pounds, but they will eventually plateau as the fat cells protect themselves and become insulin resistant.

“As all these major tissues, this massive body becomes resistant, your liver, muscles and fat, your pancreas is putting out more insulin to compensate, so you are hyperinsulinemic [having an abnormally high level of insulin in the blood] and you’ve got insulin floating around all the time.

“Insulin floating around in the blood causes a plaque build up. Insulin causes the blood to clot too readily. Insulin causes cells that accumulate fatty deposits. Every step of the way, insulin’s got its fingers in it and is causing cardiovascular disease. It fills it with plaque, it constricts the arteries, it increases platelet adhesiveness and ability of the blood to coagulate [clot]. Any known cause of cardiovascular disease, insulin is a part of.”

“If you want to know if insulin sensitivity can be restored to its original state, well, perhaps not to its original state, but you can restore it to the state of about a ten year old.”

“You can increase sensitivity by diet and a lot of supplements.”

excerpted from a talk at the Designs for Health Institute given
by Dr. Ronald Rosedale, noted Diabetic Specialist


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