Diabetes Support

Providing Tools & Information for Diabetic Health

Category: Diabetic Articles (Page 1 of 7)

Carbohydrates in Nutrition

From the works of Ron Kennedy, M.D., Santa Rosa, California

Carbohydrates come in two basic forms: complex and simple. Simple carbohydrates (carbs) are one, two, or at most three units of sugar linked together in single molecules. Complex carbs are hundreds or thousands of sugar units linked together in single molecules. Simple sugars are easily identified by their taste: sweet. Complex carbs, such as potatoes, are pleasant to the taste buds, but not sweet.

There are two groups of complex carbs: high fiber and low fiber. High-fiber, complex carbs are not digestible, at least not by human beings, because we do not have the enzyme to do the job. Cows have that enzyme; that is why they can get calories out of grass, and we cannot. The main stuff in high-fiber, complex carbs that is indigestible by humans is called “cellulose.”

High-fiber (high-cellulose) vegetable foods are the healthiest choices for human nutrition, and intake of these foods is associated with lowered incidences of hypertension, cancer, arthritis, diabetes, etc. Examples are lettuce and broccoli. Examples of low-fiber, complex carbs are banana, tomato, squash and all cereals and grains (therefore bread and pasta), potatoes and rice.

It matters not if a carb is simple or complex. After digestion, it appears in the circulatory system in the simple form, as glucose, on its way to the cells where it is used for energy. To be transformed into simple sugars, complex carbs must be digested by the enzyme amylase. Amylase is secreted by the salivary glands, which empty into the mouth, and by the pancreas, which empties into the head of the duodenum.

Simple sugars and low-fiber, complex carbs represent a threat to health when they are consumed in inappropriate amounts such as may occur in low-soy, vegetarian diets where they are being eaten to replace the calories which would ordinarily come from protein. Processing of plant food strips away its fiber and/or vitamin content. A simple example of processing is cutting an orange in two pieces, pressing the juice into a glass and discarding the fiber. While it is true that fiber is an important part of your diet, even necessary to protect you from some diseases, carbohydrates themselves are not necessary. There are “essential” fatty acids and “essential” amino acids (from protein), however there are no known essential carbohydrates.

Most of our carbohydrates come from cereals and grains, both products of the agricultural revolution. Our bodies are not genetically designed to thrive on large amounts of these fiberless complex carbs. With the popularity of cereal- and grain-based “health diets,” carbohydrate metabolism has been upset in approximately 3/4 of the population which simply cannot handle this large load of carbs. Increased insulin output from the pancreas, over the years, results in hyperinsulinism, insulin resistance and the resulting diseases mentioned above: hypertension, dyslipidemia [disorder of fat in the blood serum], atherosclerosis [fat buildup in the large and medium sized arteries] and heart disease.

Complex carbs with lots of fiber should be consumed in proper proportion for maximum health and vitality. Complex carbs with lots of fiber are rich sources of necessary vitamins and minerals as well as enzymes when in the raw state. The problem happens when carbohydrates are altered by processes which provide empty calories stripped of much of their original food value.

I should also mention the relationship between simple sugars and mucus formation. The biochemical name for mucus is mucopolysaccharide. This literally means “mucus of many sugars,” and it tells us how mucus is formed through the linking together of sugar molecules. If you have a condition, such as asthma or emphysema, in which mucus is part of the problem, you can do yourself a lot of good by stopping your intake of simple sugars and lowering your intake of complex carbohydrates (which convert to simple sugars upon digestion). Unfortunately, this means such wonderful sweet fruits as plums, peaches, apples, etc., must go along with breads, pastas and pastries.

The most healthy form of sugar is the complex carbohydrates present in high-fiber vegetables; however, it is certainly acceptable to spice up your diet in moderation with simple sugars in the form of whole fruits – unless, of course, you are trying to avoid mucus formation. Eat your fruits, do not juice them and drink them, unless you are on a juice fast as described earlier in this book. Eating the whole fruit results in the inclusion of natural fiber, which allows proper absorption of sugars. If you must have juice, dilute it with twice the recommended amount of water, so as to get the taste without overdosing on simple sugars.

 

The Result of Excess Carbohydrate Intake

Excess carbohydrates also causes generalized vascular disease. The high-carbohydrate diet that is now so popular, causes the pancreas to produce large amounts of insulin, and if this happens for many years in a genetically predisposed person, the insulin receptors throughout the body become resistant to insulin. Because insulin’s action is to drive glucose into the cells, this results in chronic hyperglycemia, also called “high blood sugar.” A large portion of this sugar is stored as fat resulting in obesity. Excess insulin also causes hypertension and helps initiate the sequence of events in the arterial wall that leads to atherosclerosis and heart disease.

Adult onset diabetes is known to be greatly benefited by the adoption of a low carbohydrate diet, moderate in fat, which stresses the importance of a regular intake of sufficient protein. You will not hear this advice from the American Diabetes Association (or from most doctors), since they are still operating on the research as it was twenty years ago.

Many cancers, such as breast, colon and lung cancer, apparently have a hereditary tendency. However, it may be that nutritional habits are passed on from one generation to the next, thus accounting for the familial tendency toward cancer.

Excess fats damage the immune system. Excess carbohydrates upset the hormonal system mentioned above and results in an imbalance that also suppresses the immune system. Thus obesity is associated with a higher incidence of infection.

(Dr. Kennedy is particularly skilled in the treatment of vascular disease, fatigue syndromes and digestive disorders)

Marinated Vegetables & Turkey Platter Recipe

Ingredients:
1/3 cup tarragon vinegar
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves
1/2 teaspoon ground mustard
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped (or use 1 teaspoon crushed garlic from jar)
1 medium cucumber, sliced (1/2 of a long seedless cuke is good)
1 medium red onion, sliced and separated into rings
1 medium green bell pepper, cut into rings, cut in half
1 medium red bell pepper, cut into rings, cut in half
1 medium yellow bell pepper, cut into rings, cut in half
Kale or red-leaf lettuce leaves
24 thin slices smoked turkey (about 1 1/2 pounds)

Instructions:

Mix vinegar, oil, oregano, mustard, pepper, and garlic. Place cucumber, onion, bell peppers, and tomatoes in sealable heavy-duty plastic bag (or a large Tupperware-type container). Pour vinegar mixture over vegetables; seal bag and toss. Refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight.

Line serving platter with kale or lettuce. Drain vegetables. Arrange vegetables and turkey on lettuce.


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What to Feed Your Cat for Healthy Blood Sugar Levels and a Healthy Cat

Your cat is most often one of your closest friends and it can be very hard on both you and your cat when he or she has nutritional deficiencies.

Cats are carnivores! In the wild and in zoos they eat raw meat. Their food does not contain carbohydrates. Carbohydrates convert to sugar in a feline’s digestive tract.

Their bodies simply do not process blood sugar like they should and this plant-based nutritional product (WSN Glucose Support Formula) helps their body metabolize blood sugar more efficiently.

Fortunately, your cat’s body has miraculous healing powers, is very resilient and operates in a very intelligent manner. If you give your cat the right fuel and the right nutrients, he or she will respond very quickly. Some exercise also helps!

One of the most important things to get correct is what your cat eats.

There is a huge variety of cat foods on the market and you need to know which ones are good to feed your cat.

All cats are carnivores, like lions and tigers, and their body is designed the same way even though they are domesticated. So feeding your cat the appropriate food is very important to your cat’s overall health and nutritional needs.

Domestic cats will normally eat 4 to 6 ounces of food a day, some may eat more.

You DO NOT want to feed your cat ANY food that contains any of the following ingredients within the first 5 ingredients on the label:

Corn (meal), rice (any type), wheat, barley, rye, sorghum, potato (any type), carrots, beets, rye, oats, peas, yams, beans of any kind (Including the flour or mail from any of the above ingredients.)

You will see that dry food contains a lot of these ingredients.

Cats in the wild never eat these ingredients because they are carnivores and only eat other animals.

Big cats in the zoo are never fed these ingredients. Their good health is maintained by a 100 percent raw meat diet.

Getting Your Cat Started on the Right Diet

Remember, the first steps to doing this are:

  1. Restrict the carbohydrates in your cat’s diet and
  2. Get your cat the right nutritional supplement

These two actions are not optional or negotiable!

Doing 1 and 2 above on a regular basis is the only way to address key health issues that can affect your cat’s health and balance their body’s metabolism for a long lasting life.


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Are You Getting the Information You Need from Your Doctor

When you or a loved one becomes ill, it is usual to turn to the family doctor or specialist for advice. But if the recommended solution for the illness gives you concern or just doesn’t make sense to you, what should you do?

You should find another health professional that will direct you to a course of action (who will explain it in a way that you can fully understand) that makes complete sense to you.

Remember, if a person cannot explain something to you in a way that you can understand and that makes sense to you, that person really doesn’t understand it himself or herself.

But how can it be that doctors will direct patients to do something that that they themselves do not really fully understand, or is not in the best interest of the patient?

We hear how this can come about from one of the most highly regarded doctors in the medical profession today, from an article entitled:

Conformity* of Thought Among Doctors

[*Definition – Conform: bring into agreement; make similar.]

“More than any other profession, medicine develops, even demands, conformity among its practitioners. The concept of ‘accepted practices’ carries considerable weight in the medical profession.”

“For the young physician, the pressures of conformity start in medical school and are intensified in the training programs that follow.”

“The amount of material that a medical student or a training physician is expected to learn and understand, in addition to the time that he or she must spend caring for patients, is so large, that little time can be spent asking whether what is being taught is the best approach to a particular problem.”

“Since there is general conformity of medical practices and education across the country, there is little reason for the physician in training to have any doubts that he or she is learning the superior, if not the only, method of treating our common diseases.”

“After completion of medical training, conformity is necessary to receive hospital privileges and to acquire patients by referral from other doctors. The fear of disapproval from other physicians may sometimes be greater than the desire to do what seems best for the patient.”

“This fear is justified, for nonconforming physicians can be stripped of their ability to practice medicine regardless of the benefit their patients may be receiving from their particular approach.”

“Therefore, conforming to today’s accepted practices ensures a degree of safety for the physician. Regardless of the outcome of a therapy, good or bad, physicians are above blame if they have complied with the currently accepted approaches.”

“They can take comfort knowing that they did ‘what was considered best.’ This of course could be true, but what was thought best at any time in history is only just that – what was thought best at that time.”

“It bears repeating: The history of medicine, even to the present day, is as much a sequence of failures abandoned as well as successes built upon. Yet each ‘abandoned failure’ was strongly believed in and practiced in its day.”

“Even modern medicine is constantly cleaning house. It is estimated that 50 percent of all accepted medical practices are abandoned or replaced by safer or more effective ones every 20 years!”

“Until then, whatever is the ‘accepted practice’ of the day will be dispensed [Definition: provide to a number of people.] with enthusiasm and confidence by most physicians.”

“It is not hard to see, therefore, how something as simple as looking to diet and exercise as the first-line, even superior, therapy for the diabetic could be ignored, even belittled, given the present enthusiasm for drugs and technology that is brought about by medical training and continued by the forces of professional conformity.”

excerpted from Reversing Diabetes
by Julian M. Whitaker, M.D.

Always be willing to ask questions and demand answers, and demand that the answers make sense to you. If your doctor can’t explain what you want to know, or “does not have the time”, then it’s time for you to find another doctor who will and can. Do not allow yourself to settle for second-class service or a second-class doctor.


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What is Pre-Diabetes or Insulin Resistance?

Other than the genes you inherited, there are two primary causes of insulin resistance:

1) A long-term diet that has been high in carbohydrates and
2) Nutritional deficiencies.

When you eat, your body breaks the food down into sugar (glucose), which then enters your blood stream. When the glucose in the blood increases, the body produces insulin to push the sugar out of your bloodstream and into the cells where it can be used. When insulin is doing its job, it will keep your blood sugar in normal range.

The human body evolved eating meat, fat and high fiber vegetables, with some roots and tubers.

Eight thousand years ago the “agricultural revolution” took place, with man learning how to domesticate grain. Virtually overnight, man became dependant upon carbohydrates as the main source of food. Archeologists point to that exact time period that the average height of man drops by two inches and all of the degenerative diseases we have today became prevalent in the society of that time.

Carbohydrates are simply long chains of sugar molecules hooked end-to-end. When a person eats carbohydrates their normal digestive process breaks up these chains into the individual sugar molecules, and they pass right through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream, and load up the bloodstream with sugar.

If this happened every once in a while it would not be a problem. But as diets today are so high in carbohydrates, people have a constant high level of sugar pouring into their bloodstream year after year.

This requires the body to continuously produce high levels of insulin to keep that sugar level down. (Remember, Insulin’s job is to push sugar out of the bloodstream into the cells where it is used for energy.)

Eventually the cells in the body become insensitive to the effects of the insulin. There are little doors to the cell (called “cell receptors”) where insulin pushes the glucose into the cell. When these cell receptors become insensitive to the insulin, insulin cannot open these doors. This is called insulin resistance.

To handle this problem the body begins to produce even higher levels of insulin. This continues until their pancreas (where insulin is made) reaches the maximum amount of insulin it can produce, and when the insulin resistance of the cells increases again, the blood sugar begins to rise out of control.

The result is type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is actually an extreme case of insulin resistance.

When the body has become insulin resistant, the body needs a low carb pre diabetes diet to maintain normal bloods sugars and needs specific nutrients supplements to re-sensitize the cell receptors of the body to the insulin the body is making.


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Your Nerves and Vitamins

Your Nerves and Vitamins

The daily intake of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients affects the ability of the nervous system to perform its many necessary functions. There are several vitamins and minerals that directly influence nervous system functioning and health, and it is important to see to it that these are taken at adequate levels.

Because of the fact that commercial farmland today is extremely depleted of minerals, eating fresh fruits and vegetables nowadays no longer ensures that you will receive the vitamins and minerals that your body needs to maintain health and vigor. Because of this, most people supplement with vitamins and minerals.

Unfortunately, most of the vitamin and mineral supplements one finds in drug stores and health food shops are just isolated man-made chemicals, and they are not even close to the real vitamins and minerals found in fresh fruits and vegetables.

To be effectively absorbed and utilized by the body, vitamins and minerals must be the way they are in food. It’s like eating all the nutritious food you need, but without the bulk of the food.


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Neuropathy Drug Risks

Did You Know that Neuropathy Drugs Have a Greater Suicide Risk?

If you know someone who is taking Neurontin or Lyrica, you should forward this email to them. You just might save a life!

The FDA did an analysis of 199 studies done on a total of 44,000 patients who were taking anti-epileptic drugs. The results showed there was twice the risk of suicidal behavior in using anti-epileptic drugs as compared with patients taking a placebo.

Two of the anti-epileptic drugs in these studies were Gabapentin (marketed as Neurontin) and Pregabalin (marketed as Lyrica). Both of these drugs are advertised for neuropathy and are made by the drug company Pfizer.

In 2004 Pfizer was fined by the FDA and paid over 430 million dollars for promoting Neurontin to doctors as a medication for neuropathy, a use for which it was never authorized!

So here we have a drug company making two drugs that are prescribed by doctors for neuropathy, one of which was never authorized by the FDA for that use, and both are associated with a greater risk of suicidal behavior.

Drugs can never heal the body as they are an alien substance in the body. They cannot address the root of the problem, which for most people who have neuropathy, are very specific nutritional deficiencies.

There is a safe way to address and help reverse neuropathy by supplying the exact nutrients needed.


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Triglycerides and Cholesterol – How To Lower Them Naturally

High levels of triglycerides [fat particles in the blood stream] and cholesterol often accompany the diabetic condition. In truth, the high blood sugar levels, high triglycerides and high cholesterol levels are in fact three of the many symptoms caused by insulin resistance.

The use of medical drugs and a low fat diet are not the answer to bringing down cholesterol or triglyceride levels. Even the theory behind the cause of high levels of triglycerides and cholesterol were incorrect to begin with as you can see from the following excerpt:

“Ever since the daily intake of dietary cholesterol was considered a major causative factor in coronary heart disease, the theory behind this type of thinking has had serious inconsistencies. First of all, one of the inconsistencies is the fact that 80 percent of those who suffer heart attacks have normal cholesterol in their blood. Secondly, most of the cholesterol that exists in the body comes not from the dietary intake of fatty foods, but rather is produced by the body, and in particular by the liver. Blood levels of cholesterol do not correspond, therefore, to dietary levels of the substance in everyday situations.”

“Moreover, physicians at the Mayo Clinic have shown that the severity of arteriosclerosis [disorders of arteries] is not always related to the levels of serum [liquid part of blood] cholesterol, much less dietary cholesterol. They discovered, for example, that people with low serum cholesterol could have just as severe arteriosclerosis as those with high serum cholesterol.”

excerpted from Victory Over Diabetes
by William H. Philpott, M.D. & Dwight K. Kalita, Ph.D.

In other words, what these physicians found was that you could have high cholesterol levels in the blood stream and have no plaque buildup on the insides of your arteries, or you could have low levels of cholesterol in the blood stream and have serious plaque buildups in your arteries.

The understanding of the causes of high triglycerides and cholesterol levels is now very slowly spreading through the medical community. Yet, newspapers, magazines, radio and television continue to lead the public in the wrong direction:

“Hundreds of scientists are now reporting that an excess of insulin has been linked to high blood pressure, undesirable blood-fat levels and atherosclerosis [the build-up of plaque in the arteries], heart disease, stroke, adult-onset diabetes, and more.”

“Investigation into the relationship of diet to blood sugar, blood fat, and insulin, all overwhelmingly point to the key roll that carbohydrate-rich diets and high insulin levels can play in raising your blood-fat levels. And, although major studies report that low-fat diets are failing to help most of us reduce our blood-fat levels, the media continues to act as if low fat is the answer.”

“Certainly, big business appears to play a major role in the low-fat cure-all push. Food manufacturers have found big sales in ‘healthy foods’ that are full of artificial, and often cheaper, ingredients.”

excerpted from The Carbohydrate Addict’s LifeSpan Program
by Richard Heller M.S., Ph.D. & Rachael Heller M.A., M.Ph., Ph.D.

Most medical schools in the Unites States offer little or no training in diet and nutrition, or the use of vitamins and minerals to reverse health challenges. As a result doctors most often direct their patients to the use of drugs, medications or operations to handle health problems, problems that could very often be handled with correct nutrition and proper supplements:

“According to the American Heart Association, substituting carbohydrates for fats may raise triglyceride levels and may decrease HDL (‘good’) cholesterol in some people. Yet most doctors persist in telling patients who gain weight easily to cut down on fat and meat. For some, this advice is a recipe for disaster. Why?”

“Decreasing fat and protein in the diet inevitably means increasing carbohydrates. This shifts the metabolism toward fat storage – and higher triglycerides. Not only that, it also leaves the person feeling hungry all the time and subject to blood sugar swings.”

“When the situation is reversed, however – when carbs are cut and replaced with dietary fat and protein – the opposite happens. Blood sugar metabolism normalizes, triglycerides go down, HDL cholesterol goes up, and body fat is lost.”

“All of these benefits occur without hunger and irritability that are trademarks of low-fat, reduced-calorie diet plans.”

“Many of you with evidence of insulin/blood sugar problems already have suffered years of nutritional deficits [shortages].”

“Although it might be possible to overcome this accumulated deficit with diet alone, to regain your health as rapidly as possible means supplements are needed.”

“A vitamin is an organic substance that your body needs but can’t manufacture. [With few exceptions the body cannot manufacture or synthesize vitamins.] Minerals are inorganic substances such as calcium and magnesium. Some minerals are essential, meaning that you must have them, even if only in very small amounts.”

“Vitamins and minerals are crucial for the smooth operation of the thousands of chemical processes that are constantly taking place in your body. You need a constant and adequate supply of them.”*

excerpted from Atkins Diabetes Solution
by Mary C. Vernon, M.D., C.M.D. & Jacqueline A. Eberstein, R.N.

To further illustrate the point of the difference between an incorrect approach and the right way to handle high triglyceride and cholesterol levels, here is an excerpt regarding a patient named “Jayne” who was apparently healthy but on a routine physical examination was found to have triglycerides of 3,000 (normal is usually 100-250)and cholesterol levels of 750 (considered normal if 200 or less). Her doctor put her on a high carbohydrate – low protein diet, and two potent cholesterol-lowering medications:

“Jayne faithfully followed her doctor’s orders for six months, although not without difficulty. The medications nauseated her, and the diet kept her constantly hungry.”

“By the time Jayne returned for her recheck, she was desperate for improvement. And she had improved some, but not nearly enough. Her cholesterol had dropped to 475 and her triglycerides to 2,000 – an improvement for sure, but still cause for great concern to both Jayne and her physician. They discussed her treatment options. Her doctor suggested either increasing the dosage of her cholesterol lowering medications or adding yet another medicine to her regimen.”

“Jayne wanted to think about it before she decided which option to take. She decided to do neither until she got a second opinion from another physician, so she came to our clinic.”

“We instructed Jayne to stop taking both of her cholesterol-lowering medications and to change her diet drastically. Her new nutritional regimen allowed meat (even red meat), eggs, cheese, and many other foods that most people view as causing cholesterol problems, not solving them. We told her to call in three weeks to check in and to come back to have her blood checked in six weeks.”

“She called at her appointed time and reported that she ‘felt grand’ and that her nausea and hunger had vanished. The results of her blood work astounded her. Jayne’s cholesterol level had fallen to 186 and her triglycerides to 86. Her blood sugar had dropped to 90, everything was back in normal range. As you might imagine, she was ecstatic.”

“How could this happen? How can a diet virtually everyone believes should raise cholesterol actually lower it – and in a person who doesn’t have just a slight cholesterol elevation but a major one?”

“We know Jayne’s case is not a freak happenstance or an aberration because we’ve tried variations of the same regimen on countless other patients – all with the same results.”

“The results make perfect sense, because Jayne’s problem, her illness, is not the elevated cholesterol level – that’s merely a sign of the underlying problem. Her problem is ‘hyperinsulinemia’, a chronic elevation of serum insulin.”

“After six weeks on a diet designed to lower her insulin level, Jayne’s lab work showed that she had dropped hers to almost normal. By treating her real problem – excess insulin – we were able to solve her secondary problems of elevated cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood sugar.”

“Standard medical therapies treat the symptoms of excess insulin – elevated cholesterol, triglycerides, blood sugar, blood pressure, and obesity – instead of treating the excess insulin itself. Unfortunately, the standard treatment of the symptoms may even raise the insulin levels and worsen the underlying problem.”

“For your body to function optimally, your diet must include sufficient amounts of micronutrients [a substance required for normal growth and development but only in very small quantities] – vitamins and minerals. We ask that you ensure the micronutrient adequacy of your diet by supplementing it.”

excerpted from Protein Power
by Michael R. Eades, M.D. & Mary Dan Eades, M.D.


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Truth About the Diabetic Diet

So, if diabetic medications, while sometimes effective at suppressing diabetic symptoms, are not the means of successfully addressing what is causing the diabetic condition, what can be done to address the diabetic condition and the complications that often arise as a result? Here we see a summary of the most recent research into the nutritional causes of the diabetic condition:

“Carbohydrates come in two basic forms: complex and simple. Simple carbohydrates (carbs) are one, two, or at most three units of sugar linked together in single molecules. Complex carbs are hundreds or thousands of sugar units linked together in single molecules. Simple sugars are easily identified by their taste: sweet. Complex carbs, such as potatoes, are pleasant to the taste buds, but not sweet.”

“Most of our carbohydrates come from cereals and grains, both products of the agricultural revolution [which occurred only about 8,000 years ago]. Our bodies are not genetically designed to thrive on large amounts of these fiberless complex carbs. With the popularity of cereal- and grain-based “health diets,” carbohydrate metabolism has been upset in approximately 3/4 of the population which simply cannot handle this large load of carbs. Increased insulin output from the pancreas, over the years, results in hyperinsulinism, insulin resistance and hypertension, dyslipidemia [disorder of fat in the blood serum], atherosclerosis [fat buildup in the large and medium sized arteries] and heart disease.”

“Excess carbohydrates also causes generalized vascular disease. The high-carbohydrate diet which is now so popular causes the pancreas to produce large amounts of insulin, and if this happens for many years in a genetically predisposed person, the insulin receptors throughout the body become resistant to insulin. Because insulin’s action is to drive glucose into the cells, this results in chronic hyperglycemia, also called “high blood sugar.” A large portion of this sugar is stored as fat resulting in obesity. Excess insulin also causes hypertension and helps initiate the sequence of events in the arterial wall which leads to atherosclerosis and heart disease.”

“Adult onset diabetes is known to be greatly benefited by the adoption of a low carbohydrate diet, moderate in fat, which stresses the importance of a regular intake of sufficient protein. You will not hear this advice from the American Diabetes Association, (or from most doctors) since they are still operating on the research as it was twenty years ago.”

excerpted from
Carbohydrates in Nutrition by Ron Kennedy, M.D.


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The Question of Vitamin B-12

Vitamin B-12 is necessary in human health for the formation of proteins and red blood cells, and for the functioning of the nervous system. It is vitally important in maintaining the health of the outer sheathing (protective covering, also called the myelin sheath) that surrounds nerve cells.

B-12 also participates in a variety of cellular reactions to release energy from carbohydrates, fats and proteins.

Vitamin B-12 is found only in animal products; meat, fish, eggs, and dairy products. Most people’s diets do not contain sufficient B-12, and so, over the years, the amount of B-12 diminishes in the body till there is an actual deficiency of this important vitamin.

Absorption of vitamin B-12 from food occurs in a unique way. Vitamin B-12 is released from food by digestion, especially by stomach acid. The vitamin B-12 binds with a special protein that is secreted by the mucous membrane of the stomach called the “intrinsic factor.”

The resulting complex travels to the last section of the small intestine, called the ileum. Ileum cells then absorb vitamin B-12. Absorption is very poor unless the “intrinsic factor” is present.

As the body ages it often produces lower quantities of both stomach acid and the “intrinsic factor,” thus reducing the amount of B-12 that can be absorbed from the diet.

The vitamins and minerals in food are constantly being used to create and support the life processes in the body and must be replenished from time to time.

Because the body’s reserves of B-12 continues to drop as our body ages, doctors often recommend B-12 shots each month for older people.

As most people don’t like shots, they often supplement what they need with vitamin pills, capsules, drinks, etc. Most of these contain a form of B-12 called cyanocobalamin, which is not usable by the body.

A very small percentage of cyanocobalamin is converted into methylcobalamin and stored in the liver. As the body ages, it becomes less and less able to convert cyanocobalamin to methylcobalamin, so use methycobalomin for real results you can feel.

There is no upper limit to the amount of B-12 that you can safely take without any side effects.

The WSN Nerve Support Formula contains the methylcobalamin and other B vitamins you need to nutritionally support your body’s nervous system.


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